Council appoints independent members

SET THE BAR: Whyalla mayor Jim Pollock says the council wants to set the bar for the region with its approach to audit committee requirements appointing two independent members to its audit committee.Whyalla City Council has adopted a ‘best practice approach’ with the appointment of two independent members to its audit committee.
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Jim Hayward has been appointed as a second independent member joining the previously appointed audit committee chair Stephen Coates.

Whyalla mayor Jim Pollock said the council wanted to set the bar for the region with its approach to audit committee requirements and must strive to reach the same standards as those achieved in the metropolitan area.

“Regional councils find it difficult to fill these independent expert roles with the right expertise and Whyalla has been exceptionally fortunate in the interest shown in the committee,” Mr Pollock said.

“Stephen Coates has been appointed the independent chair of the audit committee and will come with a plethora of knowledge and experience in governance, risk and insurance and has over 20 years of experience in accounting and consulting.”

It was identified at January’s council meeting that an audit committee was beneficial to the council and it was best practice to have at least two independent members to provide an optimal level of transparency and accountability to the community and other stakeholders.

In a report to the February meeting chief executive officer Peter Peppin said while the council had already resolved to appoint four elected members to the committee, appointing a second independent member would see the committee exceed Local Government Association financial regulation requirements.

Mr Peppin said if the council sought to achieve a higher standard, a rescission of the elected member appointments was necessary.

The council agreed unanimously and revoked the previous elected member appointments, paving the way for the appointment of Mr Hayward.

Mr Pollock and councillors Colin Carter and Tim Breuer were unanimously appointed to join Mr Coates and Mr Hayward.

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Alleged assault on Horton Street

A MANwas charged with assault occasioning actual bodily harm and affray after an altercation in Horton Street on Sunday.
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Just after 2am on Sunday morning a 26-year-old male was walking in Horton Street, Port Macquarie when he allegedly had a verbal altercation with a 23-year-oldmale.

It is alleged the26-year-old walked away towards the intersection of Horton and Williams Streets when he was struck in the back of the legs by the 23-year-old.

Police allege hewas able to get to his feet before a further altercation erupted. The 26-year-old fell to the ground where he was allegedly stomped on and rendered unconscious. Police said there was a significant amount of blood coming from the man’s ears and nose.

The accused was arrested and conveyed to Port Macquarie police station whilethe victim was treated by ambulance and conveyed to Port Macquarie Base Hospital for scans on his skull.

The accused was charged with assault occasioning actual bodily harm and affray. He was conditionally bailed to appear at the Port Macquarie Local Court on March 18.

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Late night hours under review

Hotel Eyre manager Carl Church has said he felt for South Australian licensed venues that had been affected by the government’s late night trading hours, however, Hotel Eyre was not one of them. Late night lockouts are continuing to prove effective for local venues, despite an imposing review of its code of practice.
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The Late Night Trading and General Codes of Practice is currently under review by the state government after concerns it had played a hand in the foreclosure of South Australian venues.

The review focuses particularly on the Late Night Code, which was developed in 2012 and 2013 following community concern about a number of late-night, alcohol-fuelled violent incidents in Adelaide and around the state.

Mr Church said lockout for Hotel Eyre was 1am, however, the trading code allowed venues to welcome new patrons up until 3am.

He said the Hotel Eyre had operated on an earlier lockout for many years after working with local police to curb anti-social behaviour.

“A 1am lockout is early, but it is done in support with the police that we do have the lockout, due to previous issues here,” Mr Church said.

“We have a zero tolerance at the Hotel Eyre, we work closely with the police to make sure that’s maintained.

“A 1am lockout works for us in that aspect, we always work with the police and government agencies to ensure our customers have a great night and don’t have any issues with any form of anti-social behaviour.”

Mr Church said the code would have been more effect in regional areas such as Port Lincoln as there were more venue options for pub goers in the city, while Whyalla was limited.

“There’s nothing worse than having to make the decision at 10 to 3 about where to go before lockout,” he said.

Mr Church said he was pleased the state government was reviewing the code as many venues around the state had said it was affecting business.

“I do feel for those venues in Adelaide and other areas, it must be frustrating for them,” he said.

“If this is a direct result and affecting their business something needs to be done.”

Mr Church said Hotel Eyre worked accordingly with police to make sure the venue was safe for all patrons.

“Security aren’t there to be in people’s faces, [it’s] just to remind people that that type of behaviour isn’t warranted and won’t be tolerated,” he said.

“Many patrons have safety they are required to adhere to in workplaces, and have to apply the same principles to our workplace and staff, so that’s why there is a zero tolerance – alcohol shouldn’t be a factor or an excuse.”

If you are over 18 and want to have your opinion heard about the latenight code, head to http://yoursay.sa.gov.au/yoursay/late-night-drinking-code and complete the survey.

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Keeping ‘memories alive’

MEMORIES: Copperhouse Court clinical nurse Margie Bambridge is asking for community sponsorship to keep memories alive. She’s pictured with Peter Medlicott’s memory box prototype.A partnership between Copperhouse Court and Whyalla Men’s Shed is aiming to keep happy memories alive.
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Men’s Shed member Peter Medlicott is working with Copperhouse Courtclinical nurse Margie Bambridge to organise Memory Boxes for the facility’s 10-bed dementia unit.

Memory Boxes filled with treasured keepsakes will be placed on the walls outside residents’ rooms to provide a visual prompt for residents, families and staff about the person’s life.

Mrs Bambridge said the boxes would help residents recognise their living environment and where their rooms were as well as evoke memories and prompt a conversation between staff and residents.

“They are boxes you have on the wall outside a resident’s room; they have keepsakes in them,” she said.

“You create a picture of what they liked in their life; we want to keep those memories alive.”

However, the project needs community sponsorship for the vision to come to life.

Mrs Bambridge said families of residents or businesses could sponsor the boxes with the Men’s Shed willing to construct them at $40 each.

Mrs Bambridge said she wanted the project to be collaborative and hoped it would forge a stronger relationship between staff and families.

“We want to get families involved in filling these boxes because they have the memories,” she said.

“The more we can do to manage dementia and help that journey is really important because it’s an awful disease.”

For more information, or to donate, contact Copperhouse Court on8645 9499.

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GALLERY: Tomorrow’s champions today

GALLERY: Tomorrow’s champions today JUNIOR ACTION: Nathan Hewitt. Photo: JUDE KEOGH
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JUNIOR ACTION: Peter Byrne. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Mitch Crossman. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Will McLean. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: James George. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Peter Byrne. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: James George. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Kade Cotter. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Chloe Harshmann. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Nash Maclean. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Cezar Dihel. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Jack Morrison. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Gabe Moes. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Blake Randahl. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Katie Holmes. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Keely Ford. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Hannah Dewar. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Nathan Hewitt. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Coach Mike Badman, Peter Byrne and Tom Anderson. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Tyler Ayling. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Mitch Kelly. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Tom Anderson. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Katie Holmes. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

JUNIOR ACTION: Jack Sargent. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

TweetFacebookCENTRAL Western Daily photographer Jude Keogh was on the sidelines on the weekend to capture the action in Orange’s junior cricket and softball games.

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